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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
the presidential campaign what president obama used to say over and over again about tax rates? about what his plan was for tax rates? president obama was crystal clear about what e he wanted. >> i have said that for incomes over $250,000 a year that we should go. back to the rates that we had when bill clinton was president. >> i want to reform the tax codes so that it's fair. the same rate we had when bill clinton was president. >> we have to ask you and me and the wealthiest among us to go back to the clinton rates for income above $250,000. >> the clinton tax rates, we need to go back. that's not a generic policy idea. that's really specific. the clinton tax rate for high income earners was 39.6%. that's what president obama was calling for during the campaign. that's still what president obama is calling for now. but now when you ask him if that's the red line, if it you ask if he will accept anything else, he doesn't really answer. >> tax rates. are you -- is there no deal at the end of the year if tax rates for the top 2% aren't the clinton tax rates, period. no ifs, ands or buts on that spe
contact congress and take the president's side in these negotiations over taxes and sending. the president asking people to use twitter and facebook and anything else they can in social media to weigh in on these negotiations in terms of contacting congress. the president touring outside of washington like it was still during the campaign. building up support for his side of the argument. all to increase his political capital in this fight he's having with the republicans in congress. now the republicans have not been shy in condemning the president for taking this pop list approach in the way he's trying to get his way in the fight. the republicans own strategy is basically the opposite to what the president is doing. they are keeping their side of the argument very firmly within the beltway. they are not out barn storming anybody on this. they are not asking the public to get involved. they are trying to make sure this conversation ventures no further afield than the sunday morning talk shows. let's keep this in washington. because it is in the belt beltway where the republican side of t
a doomsday scenario in the event that republicans have to compromise on tax rates. on monday, abc's jonathan carl explained how it worked. he said "republicans are seriously considering a doomsday plan if fiscal cliff talks collapse entirely. it would be quite simple. house republicans would allow a vote on extending the bush middle class tax cuts. that bill already passed in august in the senate. and offer the president nothing more. no extension to the debt ceiling, nothing on unemployment, nothing on loopholes. congress would recess for the holidays and the president would face a big battle early in the year over the debt ceiling. ." two republican officials tell me this is becoming the most likely scenario. "the new york times" added more detail including this amazing quote from rep michael c. burgess of texas. "there's always better ground, but we have to get there." in this case the better ground is exchanging the threat of a congressionally induced recession for the threat of a congressionally induced global financial crisis combined with recession. that, that is your better ground? t
the administration's offer to congressional republicans. the offer was essentially a mix of tax hikes as well as spending cuts the democrats are not crazy about. essentially, here are some things. republicans rejected that white house proposal out of hand. they said they were flabbergasted that was put forward as the president's idea of compromise. we have since learned what the republicans republicans' view of compromise is. as i mentioned last night, before the election john boehner proposed that revenues could be raised by this much. that's the pile of money there. after the election, which his party lost, he's now offering post-election this much new revenue. so his offer since losing the election got worse. that new offer came in a new outline of proposals that the republicans sent to the president in a letter yesterday. it's a plan that they describe in their letter as "a fair middle ground." here's what they consider a fair middle ground. we did this in chart form today. because it turns out it's really simple. and looking at it this way makes it simple. here's what they are offering.
the eligibility age. and rather than taking a hyper-tax, deep footnote approach as he did, he could have just come out and said nap that. he did not come out and say that. because john boehner may be many things, but he is not stupid. he understands the bind he is in. his party is antagonistic to medicare. and it is also generally funded by lots of people who would like to see medicare dissolved. and it is also a party that won people on medicare by 12 points in the last election, even though they lost the election overall by three points. in fact, john boehner's cageyness about saying what he actually wants to do is par for the course in this debate. that is actually the norm for the politics of medicare. and the reason is a deep contradiction at the heart of our national conversation on the issue. medicare is massively, overwhelmingly popular. it is very successful. and it is, over the long-term, projected to be the biggest contributor to deficits down the road. which mean people in the country, voters everywhere, love medicare and do not want it to be cut. and wonks in washington, d.c. spend th
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)